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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
developments in the attacks on u.s. facilities in both cairo, egypt. and benghazi, libya. u.s. sources now tell cnn the attack in benghazi was actually planned in advance and the perpetrators used a protest outside the u.s. consulate in benghazi there simply as a diversion. four americans died including the united states ambassador to libya chris stevens. our foreign affairs correspondent, jill dougherty, has been working her sources to get a better idea on exactly what happened. our senior international correspondent nic robertson is monitoring the search for who's responsible. and our pentagon correspondent chris lawrence is keeping tabs on the u.s. military's response to what's going on as well. let's go to jill first. she's watching what's going on. jill, what's the latest over at the state department beyond the heartbreak of a top u.s. diplomat, three others killed? >> right, wolf. just in a few minutes we're expecting an update, a briefing on background by senior officials here at the state department. but for now this is what we know based on the conversations and what we are hearing fro
.s. personnel have been evacuated from benghazi, libya. and very small skeletal staffs in tripoli and also yemen. but the u.s. is also looking at other countries. we have ten countries that you just mentioned where there are u.s. protests. clearly they're looking at sudan right now. right now they're not evacuating people. again, they're saying stay tuned. make sure you're registered with the embassy. right now everyone's relying on commercial travel to get out. the roads are open. everything's open, wolf. right now it's just seems to be localized just at these u.s. embassies and not kind of chaos spreading throughout the country. >> these are live pictures we're showing our viewers now from tahrir square in cairo. not very far from the u.s. embassy. you've been there, i've been there. it's only a few -- maybe a block away. but they have apparently established all sorts of barriers around the u.s. embassy. it's a huge embassy too. >> it's a huge embassy. it's like a complex, if you will. even as you have the setback in these reinforcements, they're asking the local government in the last couple
, president obama condemned the attack in benghazi that led to the death of four americans including the death of ambassador chris steven. >> we will not waiver in our commitment to see that justice is done for this terrible act and make no mistake justice will be done. >> joining me chief foreign correspondent richard engel in cairo ro and nicolas burns former ambassador to nato and professor at the harvard kennedy school. first to you, richard, you've been out there all day. tell me about what's happening in cairo right now and your recap of what sparked the attacks both in cairo and benghazi? >> i think it's important to differentiate between the two because they're very different kinds of demonstrations and attacks. right now in cairo, there is still a demonstration going on, a couple hundred, maybe not even that many, hardline supporters, most of them were members of the islamic group, supporters of the old blind cleric, from the first world trade center attack. they have been organizing demonstrations in front of the u.s. embassy for a long time now and they were the core group that went
down the flag and didn't hurt anybody inside. in benghazi, the less like that it seems. it was a commando-style raid in benghazi where militants may have been angry about the same video but clearly moved in with a military style tactic. they had r the gs, heavy ma svein machine guns. it was two waves. that's not the spontaneous mob activity like we saw here in cairo. that's the kind of thing in benghazi carried out by a militant group, a terrorist group, by al qaeda potentially. and u.s. officials are looking in to that right now. also, wondering was it just a coincidence that the u.s. ambassador who's based in tripoli happened to be in benghazi at the very time of the attack? so, a lot of questions but it's clear now that these were two very different incidents. spontaneous uprising that resulted in no casualties here in cairo and a guerrilla assault in benghazi that killed the u.s. ambassador. >>> all right. here with us now is former u.s. ambassador mark ginsburg. mark, i want to start with the response yesterday from the u.s. embassy in cairo. what the statement the
states. at the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya's second largest city, at least one american staff member was killed after gunmen stormed the compound and burned it down. we've got some amateur video here into nbc news from the scene. if you listen, you can hear gunshots going off in the background. witnesses say the attackers were armed with automatic rifles, rpgs. libyan forces stationed there said to have little to stop the violence. >>> in neighboring cairo, angry protesters scaled the fortified walls of the u.s. embassy, destroyed the american flag and replaced it with a black islamic banner. most of the u.s. diplomatic staff had already been evacuated in anticipation of this protest. both incidents reportedly are reaction to a little-known amateur movie produced in the united states which ridiculed the prophet mohammed. it gained attention because an obscure florida pastor began promoting it, the same man who triggered deadly riots in afghanistan when he threatened to burn the koran. we want to go straight to cairo where we find nbc chief foreign correspondent, richard engel.
.s. consulate in benghazi. let's go live to our pentagon correspondent chris lawrence getting new details on what's going on. chris, what are you learning? >> yeah, wolf, just in the past few hours libya's own prime minister told cnn's own christiane amonopore have arrested one man. he is currently being interrogated. and libyan authorities say they have several others under surveillance and more arrests may be on the way. meantime, u.s. intelligence officials say they are digging deeper and getting more information about who may have been behind this attack. at this point they say it does not appear to be a core al qaeda group, wolf. >> what does that mean? a core al chi da affiliate groups. what does that mean, a core al qaeda group? >> they think it's very possible that this could have been an al qaeda-inspired group. some group that is not directly affiliated with the hierarchy of al qaeda but does support the aims and ideals of al qaeda. >> and what about the u.s. warships, chris, that are heading toward libya right now? where are they? and are those extra u.s. marines already on the
gadhafi and killed in a city, benghazi, that he helped to save. i understand that there are 200 marines being sent to libya. what do we know about the tk orders? >> 200 marines who are already in the region, they are aboard one of those flat-top helicopter carriers in the iranian sea. they are called amphibious ready groups, and they are called f.a.s.t. teams prepositioned in all parts of the world, but particularly the hot middle east region as we see here. it should not take long to get those 200 marines who will be particularly equipped for the mission there in tripoli. this is not some kind of military operation or a strike of any kind. they will be armed with small arms and anti-riot gear and the like as opposed to going in for a military strike or operation. now in addition to that preparations are under way, too, to send additional f.a.s.t. teams, maybe not in the same numbers, but one to cairo and one to kabul. we know from past experience there has been violent and deadly sectarian flare ups against americans in kabul over some of the actions of american troops there that were
. the powder keg is still conserving its powder, it seems. ironical ironically, benghazi remained pretty calm, perhaps the libyan government's quick crack down on perpetrators, a number have been arrested already. there's a man hunt going on if you believe what you hear from the libyan government. that's perhaps had an affect on tamping down the tension in benghazi. but the u.s. government's taking no chances. all u.s. diplomatic personnel evacuated to tripoli and only emergency staff being kept on at the embassy in the capital. as you mentioned in cairo, it's been another -- on the third day of protests -- another active day but not a lot of death -- no deaths spo-to-speak of. not too many people have been injured. so perhaps a second degree level of violence. overnight dramatic scenes near the u.s. embassy, which is about 500 yards behind me down the road next to the mosque, riot police charging forward, firing tear gas, trying in vain to disperse a crowd. this cat and mouse stand-off went on all day today. expecting to see it again later on. now the biggest concern, as you alluded to, is t
more arrests in connection with the deadly protests in benghazi at our consulate last week and u.s. ambassador chris stevens and three other americans were killed in that attack on our american interests in ben gas and i this is what it looks like inside that building where the attacks happened. as many as 50 people now have been detained in connection with this, but it is believed that they may have just been protesters, not necessarily taking part in the killings and as they sort that out the libyan government says it was planned by al qaeda who used anger over the anti-muslim film as cover for their planned attack. the fbi is expected to investigate all of this, but the agents have not yet arrived in benghazi because it has not been deemed safe enough yet. so we are told. we now have some more information on the man behind the movie, if you want to call it a movie, the anti-islam slam that's been posted on youtube, at least a trailer of it, and now we have a photo behind that man. wrapped up as he was led out of his house for questioning and the photo was taken when he was sho
curry, it lacks to be a branch of al qaeda. that's something we heard after the benghazi attack happened. where do you think we are now in terms ofterrorism. obviously as the president said, the traditional al eda ae i s t h bee decimated. top leaders including osama bin laden are gone but where are we? >> i think again that's a statement. the ail die is the al qaeda. ere are mutanrm e of wannabes and look-alikes. i think active terrorism in spite of the facthat the president rightly has given some credit for elited osamain land, inor and somewhat naive to say merely because you cut the head of the organization, now you have other groups affiliated, oftentimes rhetorically affiliated but others given gnc f ot and the arabian peninsula. it ooh's dominant force in the region in cahoots from time to time with the iranian influence as well. we're ing be dealing with activism terrori, look-akes and wannabes. >> i'm going to ask you to play chameleon again. this is a question people are thinking about. if you were a moderator at one of these debates,hat do you u d w t ask both of the candidat
.s. consulate in benghazi that killed four americans. the top libyan security physician said the attack was possibly aided by infiltrators who knew the route that consulate staff was trying to use to escape. now, two americans killed in the attack were identified thursday as two former navy s.e.a.l.s. tyrone woods of portland, oregon, former military veteran and father of two and glen doherty from massachusetts. back at home mitt romney made sulgs jobs on foreign policy. campaigning in battleground virginia, romney offered this message. >> american leadership, the middle east needs american leadership and i intend to be a president that provides the leadership that america respects. >> and romney was relatively measured responding to this barb of the president concerning an interviewing on telemundo. >> i have observed there's a tendency to shoot without aim. >> asked about it, romney chose no, sir to swing back. >> the exact same conclusion the white house reached. the statement was inappropriate. that's why they backed away from it as well. >> but the romney campaign has escalated the
. the head of the u.n. mission, the headquarters attacked in benghazi. some military officials telling us they warned the u.s. about the growing threat of extremism as it does exist, especially in the eastern part of the country. as recently as three days before the attack took place. many of the ground right now questioning whether or not the u.s. grossly underestimated the threat level against it, all the while many also saying that it was the libyan government's possibility to a certain degree to have created more security around the compound itself. and so, many are saying that the blame lies with both sides. but at the end of the day this most certainly is not the path that those that launched the regime wanted to' the country move down. >> what are you seeing now? any protests? seeing any demonstrations? >> reporter: there was. we are hearing a candle lit vigil in front of the consulate itself carried out by children, women. libyans want the world to know that this act of violence against the u.s. is by no way, shape or form representative of the libyan mind-set as a whole. they're
the tyranny of a dictator for the tyranny of a mob. there is no dignity in that. the people of benghazi sent this message loudly and clearly on friday when they forcefully rejected the extremists in their midst and reclaimed the honor and dignity of a courageous city. they mourned the loss of ambassador chris stevens, a friend and champion of a free libya. and his fallen comrades. they are not alone. people and leaders from across the region and the world and beyond have spoken in recent days against violence. foreign minister of tunisia came to washington last week and personally underscored his country's stand. and unity on this throughout the international community is crucial. because extremists around the world are working hard to drive us apart. all of us need to stand together to resist these forces and to support democratic transitions under way in north africa and the middle east. throughout this week, as i engaged my counterparts from many nations, we discussed and we will continue here at the united nations, how we can work together to build lasting partnerships focused on freedom
the time. egyptian president morsi is really upset about what happened at the u.s. embassy in benghazi and saying he's foot dragging of really giving iran full consequences. so president obama, instead of not meeting, said he's not going to meet with anybody. the secretary is really holding down the fort this week. >> everyone waits to see what mahmoud ahmadinejad will say. the secretary general told him, my understanding, is that you may want to be a little careful. >> this is his week to come on the world stage. he's always very interesting. he loves to give a press conference where he's very fiery. basically what -- although everyone has concerned about iran's behavior in the region and its nuclear program, what president ahmadinejad says sometimes does resinate with a lot of countries in the nonaligned world, countries who feel that the west, some of these u.n. security councils are the only ones who have the say in the world. so he does have an audience. i have one more question. hillary clinton 2016, what do you know? >> personally, she doesn't tell me anything. first of all, she
on the civilians in benghazi were attacks on america. there should be no doubt that we will be relentless in tracking down the killers and bringing them to justice. >> reporter: his most expansive comments on what he called the crisis in the middle east. he invoked the memory of one fallen american. >> we must reaffirm that our future will be determined by people like chris stevens and not by his killers. today we must declare that this violence and intolerance has no place among our united nations. >> reporter: to the world he offered a lesson in u.s. values. first, denouncing the insighting video. >> a crude and disgusting video sparked outrage throughout the muslim world. >> reporter: next, affirming america's embrace of all religions. >> we not only respect the freedom of religion, we have laws that protect individuals from being harmed because of how they look or what they believe. >> reporter: then a lesson in tolerance and the freedom of expressi expression. >> like me, the majority of americans are christian and we do not ban blasphemy against our own most sacred believes. i expec
official has been killed in an attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. we're just getting this information coming in. we know there was also an attack on the u.s. embassy today. this, the 11th anniversary of 9/11 on the u.s. embassy and cairo, as well. erin burnett "outfront" will have moch much more at the top of the hour. >>> few politicians are more closely associated with 9/11 than rudy guiliani. after the attacks, the former new york city mayor became known as america's mayor as he helped lead the nation forward. you've described 9/11 as both the worst day and the best day. explain why you said that. >> the worst day, because it was the worst attack, domestic attack in the history of my c country, or you have to go back to the revolution and the war of 1812 and civil war to look for similar kinds of things. certainly, new york city. and at the same time, it was a day of more heroism, more patriotic fervor, more assistance, more charitable action and activity than i ever saw, ever, in my life. i never saw this kind of desire to want the
at benghazi and the embassies around the world, the question is why does that small group of muslims, radical muslims, hate sinus >> they want power. i think it's really a struggle for power, something that's going on in nearly every country across the region. in libya, you have a huge number of people who are out with signs professing their support for not just chris stevens who lost his life, you know, supporting peace and our relationship, but you have them saying, look, we apologize. same thing in several other countries. many of the leaders have expressed the same sentiments. and so i think we need to understand that as our country has local dynamics, these countries have local dynamics, too. and you have an emerging democratic movement. you also have these old regime loyalists, soccer thugs in the case of egypt, and even these, you know, more religious extreme elements where they're jockeying for power. >> what is it about america? why do they attack so violently, these groups? >> america is a symbol, right? america is a symbol. look who's keeping it up now. nasrallah in lebanon saying
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)